Thursday, October 27, 2011

Earthquake



It has been a while since I've felt an earthquake. But last night changed all that. We stayed here, at Lake Tahoe, in order to do so some winterizing, cover the patio furniture, meet with the furnace man to have the furnace serviced, etc.

Sometime after going to bed I felt the bed shaking - I grabbed my husband, thinking he was having some kind of seizure, (although he has never had one), or thought maybe the dog was doing it somehow. It was a pretty good shake. My husband appeared to be fine so I didn't think anything more of it when this morning he mentioned not seeing anything in the news about the earthquake last night. Earthquake? Is that what all the shaking was about?

Living in Reno, we're used to tremblers. I've felt quakes that literally rocked the furniture, but it hasn't happened in many years. We know that earthquakes have been swarming in recent months. I read that there were over 150 small ones right under our house. But we've never felt one at Lake Tahoe. It reminds me of this post on Mountain Tsunamis. They are possible here in the mountains, reminding me to make sure that our emergency plan takes into account that we spend a great deal of time here.

Most of us live in areas that have some kind of danger, lets face it. If Washington DC, and New York City can have an earthquake, despite being in an area of low seismic activity, then they can happen anywhere. Even if you're not sitting on a fault line, you are still residing on the earth's crust, and there is movement going on right underneath.

It reminds me to be thankful, once again, for each day, each minute, each blessing. This warm little house is a gift, and so many are without such luxury. My thoughts are with those in Turkey right now, those who were not so lucky as to just have had their bed shake.

Update: It was a 4.7 located 35 miles west of Reno.

22 comments:

luksky said...

Last week we had a small earthquake just South of San Antonio that was felt throughout the central Texas area. Earthquakes seem to be a common occurence everywhere these days.

DJan said...

I have never felt an earthquake and hope I never do. My heart goes out to those in Turkey right now. Now that I live in Washington state, it's entirely possible I'll be exposed to one eventually.

Brian Miller said...

whew...felt my first one ina long time when the one hit VA earlier this year...they seem to be coming in quite the frequency of late...

Nancy said...

luksky - You, too? Wow, I never think of Texas being prone to earthquakes.

DJan - It's certainly possible, unfortunately. That whole Rim of Fire thing.

Brian - I'll bet that was a shocker.

Expat From Hell said...

I have been in many, and you never get over that feeling of helplessness. In some strange way, Californians don't have to endure the constant "weather alerts" on the television. They just jump up and grab you - even in the middle of the night. EFH

Rose said...

So glad you are safe enough to write about it. Scary.

Nancy said...

Expat - So true. This one was located in Plumas County. Maybe around Loyalton, I'm thinking.

Rose - Thank you. It is a bit disconcerting. I think I felt an aftershock about 10 minutes ago. Which is normal for a quake that size.

JC said...

Glad it wasn't more of one.

We have had a few but none where anything was broken.

JeannetteLS said...

I was in the car when the ripples from the one in VA hit CT. And I am glad I was. But so many things that are happening all around make me more and more grateful for what I have right now. My income cannot support me, but I DID sell my house. And I DO have something in the bank to keep me okay for a few years. And I DO still walk and maintain my independence for now.

I look around, even right here, and I recognize I am lucky. When I look at people suffering SO MUCH MORE in other countries, like Turkey, and I feel I have no business complaining at ALL.

Which doesn't mean I do not complain, but I shake myself more often, and I STOP sooner.

Can't imagine living with the threats of frequent earthquakes, hurricanes, OR tornadoes.

Hilary said...

I've experiences a few very minor tremors (including the one that hit VA) but never anything too frightful. I just can't imagine living with the fear of earthquake or worse, living in the aftermath of one.

Michelle Wells Grant said...

I hear ya! I've spent my entire life in California where I did plenty of rockin' & rollin'. But now I'm living in Texas where we have tornados, not earthquakes. The tornados scare me more!

Nancy said...

JC - Nothing broken here, either. I'm grateful!

Jeannette - I think it behooves all of us to be very mindful right now of the small luxuries - like clean water, a warm bed, enough food. You don't miss it until it's gone. We all complain, I think, but like you - I'm stopping sooner.

Hilary - Hopefully that little burp was all Mother intended for now. (Crossed fingers.)

Michelle - We moved from Reno about 8 years ago to Portland, OR, where we kept watch on the volcanos, then to Minnesota and tornados, and now back to earthquake country. I think the tornados scare me the most, too. Maybe we're more frightened by the new.

California Girl said...

As a SoCal lady born & raised, I am way used to big quakes beginning with the Sylmar quake 1970. I now live in the White Mtns of NH where one would not consider an earthquake to be a risk, but they are. We rarely have them but there are fault lines up and down the Appalachians.

Grandmother said...

I lived 14 years in the Bay area of San Francisco so I know what you're saying. Grateful daily!

T said...

YIKES! Glad your okay. Glad it wasn't like what happened in Turkey!!

claudia said...

I've always been in California, so am "used" to earthquakes. They are very disorienting. I mean geez...the earth is supposed to be the steady thing under your feet!
And you know what?!? I am probably the least prepared for anything like a disaster. I have got to get a move on here!

Nancy said...

California - I think they are everywhere!

Grandmother - We're always on edge - waiting for the "Big One."

T- Yeah, me too.

Claudia - At least some basics - water and some extra food, medicine. I have to admit though, I'm not the most prepared - especially after visiting the NASA site and reading all of the things I should have prepared.

Natalie said...

Funny how our minds try and rationalise such events.xx

Erika C. said...

Wow, so glad you are OK. We are in the middle of a big snow storm today and a branch just smashed my windshield.

Sending supportive thoughts.

love,
Erika

Rob-bear said...

So glad to hear that nobody was hurt or killed, or anything like that. At least not in your area.

Amanda said...

we've had a few earthquakes in the midwest. even though they're not strong, they serve to remind you how powerful is mother earth.

yes, our prayers go out to those in turkey. it was amazing to see that infant being rescued - when she was being pulled out it was as if she was being born from earth itself.

Deborah said...

I've never felt the earth move (under my feet, at least) and have always thought that the lack of seismic activity in my home province more than made up for the harsh winters.
The doctor in the French village where I live was in Chili when the earthquake of a year or so ag struck. He said it was a terrifying eperience, and that he thought the world - and his life - was coming to an end.
So for you to have gone back to sleep, thinking the dog might have done it...well, you've got nerves of steel, Nancy!