Sunday, October 31, 2010

Coyote Totems



Since we have been visited nightly for weeks, and on our way to dinner the other night a big, well-fed, coyote crossed the road in front of us, I decided to see what that animal totem might mean. Here from this website:

Coyotes, also known as the Desert Wolf, are recognizable by their thick bushy tail, pointy nose, and ears. In the winter their coat grows thick to protect them from the harsh weather. They can run up to 30 mph, and their call will be heard up to 3 miles. Coyotes can live in urban areas as long as food and shelter is available. They form loose family groups which form for short periods of time then break apart, depending on the food supply. This large group formation will work together to catch deer. Normally coyotes hunt alone or in pairs. In this situation, one may intentionally chase small prey into the jaws of another coyote so they both can share a meal. A good way to tell a coyote apart from a wolf is its tail, which they carry low while the others carry their tails high.
Coyote teaches us to laugh at our mistakes so we won't get mired in the pain of life's lessons. Coyote comes into our lives when we need to understand the balance of wisdom and foolishness.


It is also known for carrying with him lessons that are crucial to growth and change, yet always with a sense of fun or folly. Hmmm, I wonder if this applies to me, my husband, or Lucy?

I have to admit I could use a laugh, especially leading up to the midterm elections, but their howling is starting to get a little unnerving - especially when Lucy barks and then you hear them trying to imitate her. Here, from U-Tube:



25 comments:

Natalie said...

Yes, I see your point! Unnerving it is, indeed. Maybe their message is for you to imitate someone you see as being fun and light hearted? ♥

Brian Miller said...

yeah after hearing that it might drive me crazy. smiles. hope they bring you laughs as well...

Pat said...

Well, if it makes you feel better, one time when we were camped out near the mountains, I thought I heard a coyote yipping, and it turned out to be my husband's nose whistling. (We were in bed, sleeping. Well - HE was sleeping, I was lying there eyes wide open thinking there was a coyote nearby!)

Lori said...

Oh my...I can see how it could be unnerving. "Coyote teaches us to laugh at our mistakes so we won't get mired in the pain of life's lessons. Coyote comes into our lives when we need to understand the balance of wisdom and foolishness." That is really cool. There is great value in learning to laugh at ourselves and having balance in our lives is key to have true happiness.

Hope you found something to laugh at...laughing is the best! XX

lakeviewer said...

Hope they bring you wisdom and balance.

Trish and Rob MacGregor said...

Coyote is also a trickster. Be careful about whom you trust. Read the fine print. The trickster always has a final ace up his sleeve.

Hilary said...

I've heard the Coyote defined as a trickster too. The Ted Andrews book Animal Speak. among others, has much to say about it.

leilani said...

whoaaaa!! amazing!

Nancy said...

Natalie - Maybe. I could lighten up a bit. :-)

Brian - They are unnerving, especially when Lucy joins the cacophony.

Pat - LOL!!!

Lori - Balance - yes, I think it's the key to happiness. Laughing is definitely the best medicine.

lakeviewer - Wisdom is always helpful!

Trish & Rob - Hmmm, we just signed some papers last week...

Hilary - I'll check out the book - thanks!

Grandmother said...

We're big on wanting wisdom but coyote reminds us of the importance of foolishness too. It's a lesson I need to heed for sure!

Gaston Studio said...

Wonder what foolishness the coyote teaches; sounds like good planning and wisdom that they team up on their prey.

DJan said...

I have always thought that coyotes are exceptionally smart. If they are known as Tricksters, that reinforces my belief. Thanks for the information, I didn't know most of it.

Leah J. Utas said...

I always check what an animal means when one crosses my path like that or I see many of them within a short while. Good for you for paying attention.

Rob-bear said...

Coyotes can be tricksters, in the eyes of many aboriginal people. Best you keep a sharp eye on them.

Lizzy Frizzfrock said...

Gertie's eyes flew open when she heard the yipping! Almost daily we can hear them down in the woods near the creek in our neighborhood. They are quite noisy... but it is an interesting sound nonetheless. We do have to watch our pets.

Raksha said...

This post is very synchronistic for me in terms of the timing, although not in terms of the image. My first two blog posts, written about a year ago, were called "Coyote In My DNA," parts 1 and 2 and were about growing up and living with undiagnosed and untreated ADD.

In other words, Coyote has been a favorite metaphor of mine for a while now. But just two days ago I wrote a comment on an ADD blog I haven't visited for a while. I said something about "...Coyote the Trickster, who we should really adopt as our patron god." That's because I had just discovered that the blog owner's last name is the same as my maiden name, and he even spells it the same way.

The ability to laugh at yourself is a good thing for everyone, but for ADD/ADHD people it's absolutely crucial. It can literally be a matter of life or death at times. So while Coyote is at the root of the problem, he is at the very same time the key to living with it with some small degree of sanity. Which is very much a "Coyote" manifestation in itself!

BTW, I love the coyote totem in your photograph. I'd like to have one like that.

--Linda

Mental P Mama said...

I love to hear them yipping. Just not at my dog. Love their lesson, too.

musingegret said...

You might enjoy reading about the adventures of Shreve and the orphaned baby coyote she adopted in 2007.

http://www.dailycoyote.net/

I, too, hear the coyotes barking and yipping late at night here in the Hill Country of Central Texas; their sounds get the neighborhood dogs riled up and baying. Such cacophony, but it's nice to know that wildlife is healthy around here. Love the totem!

Robyn said...

Hopefully lots of laughs are on their way to you soon.

Butternut Squash said...

My dog went nuts when he heard the barking.

I read a novel called 'Cyote Blue' recently that was very fun and full of symbolism. It really played with the crazy trickster theme but it was also exceedingly raunchy.

Reya Mellicker said...

Yes they are tricksters - sometimes that's funny, sometimes not so much! I always think of coyote as having a relationship with the moon, too.

Happy election day!

Jo said...

We have lots of coyotes in Vancouver. A coyote ate our family cat for dinner a year ago.

They're quite brazen and tame here, and they walk through the parks, and along the streets like regular dogs. And they often have dens in people's sheds, or under porches.

The YouTube was wonderful. I listened to it twice. :-)

Midlife Jobhunter said...

Yes, both unnerving. The howling and the elections. Oh, well. Time will tell.

GYPSYWOMAN said...

love your post on the totem here, especially after my own dreams of blue lions and blue bears! and i also have loved little coyotes all my life - such fun little things - and pretty - but i do understand the yipping issue - again, though, nice to have such magnificent nature at your front door! ;)

Wendy said...

Ahh,coyote medicine. Powerful indeed. You might want to read Ted Andrews "Animal Speak" book. I love it and look up animals all the time. They do bring messages and learning.We just need to be open - and you are!